Game On – 11 Sports Announced

For the Durham Region 2019 Ontario Parasport Games

We’re excited to have confirmation of 11 sports to be part of our Games.

The list of sports includes:

Vision Impaired Curling

Vision Impaired Curling

Vision impaired curling is conducted in the same manner as able-bodied curling except with the addition of a guide.

The guide is on the ice with the curlers and assists the thrower in aiming for the skip’s broom. The guide will usually position themselves in the house closest to the thrower, and helps each curler to the level needed given their visual ability.

Visit: www.ontariocurlingcouncil.com/blog/parasport/ for more information.

5-a-side-Soccer

5-a-side soccer (aka blind soccer) is played by athletes with a visual impairment. The game is played on a smaller pitch than able-bodied soccer, and the pitch is enclosed by boards (similar to what you would expect for hockey). The game is very loud as coaches and sighted goalkeepers shout instructions, players verbally communicate, and the ball makes noise.

Visit: www.blindsports.on.ca/sports/5-side-soccer/ for more information.

Goalball

Goalball

Goalball is a sport specifically designed for athletes with a visual impairment; you will not find an able-bodied counterpart. Teams of three play on a volleyball size court; alternating throwing or bowling a ball (with bells inside of it) along the floor. The opponent’s net is nine-metres wide. Players do not leave their half of the court, but the game moves very quickly. Balls can reach speeds of up to 80km/hour.

Visit: https://blindsports.on.ca/sports/goalball/ for more information.

Para-alpine

Para-alpine

Para-alpine encompasses athletes with varying physical abilities. Athletes compete in three categories: standing, sitting or visually impaired in the same disciplines as able-bodied skiers. Certain adaptations are used to make the sport accessible to its athletes. Some of the most common adaptations that are used are special equipment (sit-skis, outrigger skis, etc.) and a guide.

Visit: www.aoprt.ca/ for more information.

Boccia

Boccia is a co-ed sport generally played by athletes with cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy or related neurological conditions. It is similar to lawn bowling, but is played indoors on a court about the size of a badminton court and lasts six ends.

Visit: www.ocpsa.com/what-is-boccia/ for more information.

Sledge Hockey

Sledge hockey (aka para ice hockey) is an adapted version of ice hockey for athletes with a physical disability. Players use a two-bladed sledge; and propel themselves with short sticks that are spiked at one end. The opposite end has a curved blade for handling the puck. Rules and gameplay are very similar to able-bodied ice hockey.

Visit: www.ontariosledge.com/ for more information.

Para-Nordic

Para-Nordic encompasses athletes with varying physical abilities. Athletes compete in three categories: standing, sitting or visually impaired. Certain adaptations are used to make the sport accessible to its athletes. Some of the most common adaptations that are used are sit-skis and the use of a guide.

Visit: www.xcskiontario.ca/paranordic/ for more information.

Sitting Volleyball

Sitting volleyball was designed for athletes with a physical disability. Athletes play on a lower net and a smaller court with rules very similar to standing volleyball. Players can move around during play, but must remain seated.

Visit: www.ontariovolleyball.org/programs/sitting-volleyball for more information.

Wheelchair Basketball

Wheelchair Basketball Canada vs. San Diego
PC: Ron Pietroniro

Wheelchair basketball can be played by athletes with varying physical abilities.

The basic rules of wheelchair basketball are similar to able-bodied basketball. The court dimensions, basket height, and distance to the foul and three-point lines are the same.

Visit: www.owsa.ca/wheelchair-basketball/ for more information.

Wheelchair Curling

Wheelchair curling is co-ed and played in the same manner as able-bodied curling. The adaptations made to the game are that athletes throw rocks from their chair using a delivery stick. In addition, there is no sweeping.

Visit: www.ontariocurlingcouncil.com/blog/parasport/ for more information.

Wheelchair Rugby

Wheelchair RugbyThe sport of wheelchair rugby is played indoors on a regulation-sized basketball court using a volleyball instead of a rugby ball. The sport originated in Winnipeg in 1976 and is played by athletes with varying levels of functional ability. Teams play with four players on the court at a time, while they carry and pass the ball trying to score by crossing the opposition’s goal line. Similar to able-bodied rugby, physical contact is an integral part of the game.

Visit: owsa.ca/wheelchair-rugby  for more information.

Watch for sport schedules closer to the Games, and come watch these #paramazing sports.

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